Curriculum design in the post-Covid world

The workforce of tomorrow now, more than ever, need to become less compartmentalised and more reactive, adaptive, creative and, above all else, ‘self-motivated’

Dr Brian Lighthill Over a decade working as a workshop facilitator with the aim of making Shakespeare’s plays relevant to learners of all ages

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This blog is in no way meant to be didactic, nor to offer a one size fits all solution. My aim is to provoke a response from all those interested in the basic premise that the education system is actually for the benefit of students – not for academics, statisticians nor MPs. I sincerely hope that I can start a dialogue with you which will hopefully go some way to inform future education policy on both delivery and assessment.

Let’s start with the title of this blog and in particular, with the word ‘Integrated’. As Harold Macmillan said, “Events, Dear Boy, Events” are the impetus for my thinking. This year, because of the Coronavirus pandemic, the modus operandi of the work-life has changed immeasurably, and as world-wide unemployment has increased exponentially youngsters are naturally becoming more worried about what kind of future lies in store for them, and how their education will help them develop the skills needed for this ‘new normal’. It could be argued that the workforce of tomorrow now, more than ever, need to become less compartmentalised and more reactive, adaptive, creative and, above all else, ‘self-motivated’. I think that the workforce of tomorrow need to develop the ability to think outside the box and outside the silos of subject specificity if they are going to be able to contribute to this ‘brave new world’.

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